Category: Research Rabbit Holes

Don’t serve your coffee from a chocolate pot!

What makes a chocolate pot different from a teapot or coffee pot?   Because anything induced by chocolate MUST be a good idea, its time for another chocolate-induced dive down the research rabbit hole! Just to refresh your memory a bit, during the regency era, there were three particular luxury drinks: tea, coffee and chocolate. …

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Chocolate cups and trembleuse saucers

What makes chocolate cups different from teacups or coffee cups? It’s been a rough month around here. My father’s had a major health crisis that resulted in three hospitalizations in as many weeks. He had surgery, then had complications and his complications had complications, literally.  How does one cope with such things? Chocolate. In frequent, …

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The Shocking Lyrics of Lavender’s Blue

Sometimes you run into some really interesting bits when you fall down the research rabbit hole. Not infrequently, the delicious little tidbits don’t fit the story you’re trying to write, but they deserve to be shared nonetheless. Here’s the latest offering. So, picture the scene: I was just minding my own business, looking for a …

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Upheaval and the Push For Reform in the 1830s

Please welcome Caroline Warfield as she shares with us about the transition between the Regency and Victorian eras. Sometimes a lover of history backs into unexpected bits of fascinating facts. That is what happened when I decided to use the children of one series as the heroes of the next. Their ages forced me to …

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What do Show Chickens have to do with Dragons? Everything!

It kind of goes without saying that historical fiction takes tons of research. Tons. Literally heaps and gobs of it. Great stacks and piles. I thought my doctoral dissertation took a lot of research. That was nothing in comparison to the thousands of pages I have read and saved on my hard drive. History=Research. OK. …

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